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the democratic national convention in charlotte, north carolina. a key state for president obama's re-election. madam woman, delegates, i accept your nomination. >> belva: the president asks for four more years to finish what he started. californians played a major role. >> our next speaker will place before you that nomination. >> belva: plus, a one on one conversation with california attorney general kamala harris. >> i'm so proud as a daughter of california to represent california on issues of what we should get in the foreclosure crisis and technology and so many other issues. >> belva: coming up next. >> belva: hello. i'm belva davis. welcome to this special edition of "this week in northern california." as we continue our convention coverage, things are winding down here in charlotte, democrats gathered to make their case to reelect president obama. throughout the week, i heard from many california delegates about what a second baobama ter would mean to them and the country. >> america, you believe in a country where everyone gets a fair shot and everyone does their fair share a
. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, the spotlight is on president obama. it's his turn to make the case for a second term, after former president clinton set the stage for him last night. >> woodruff: we assess the president's record and his leadership style as commander in chief. >> ifill: we'll be joined by our floor reporter ray suarez and historians michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> woodruff: and with us in the skybox again tonight for insight and analysis are mark shields and david brooks. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> they can be enlightening or engaging. conversations help us learn and grow. at wells fargo, we believe you can never underestimate the power of a conversation. it's this exchange of ideas that helps you move ahead with confidence. because an open dialogue is what open doors. wells fargo. together we'll go far. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology,
obama policy of looking on the arab spring as a great glorious opportunity, we have helped liberate the libyans the egyptians, yemen, and we find our embassies in these cases as of friday, under attack. what happened is when the arab spring came along it liberated a lot of fores, ethnic national liz im, antiamericannism, all these forces, john. and the united states of america, there is a real dichotomy between the two of us, how do you get along when you can do a film, a video in los angeles that insults the prophet, something done in a basement, and it can set the entire region aflame against the united states? i think we have to look at our entire policy. >> eleanor? >> the implication is president obama could have somehow prevented these uprisings and i think that is a false assumption and some of the antiamerican sentiment that you see in egypt is because they think the u.s. policy was far too long on the side of mubarak and repression. they don't look at us as great liberate tores and i don't think the president is putting us forward as the force that so-called liberated the m
the obama-bidedeticket a second chance. did president obama succeed in that, pat? >> no, he did not, john. they had a terrific condition, it was lively, more exciting than the republican convention. you had some terrific speeches. kerry was excellent, the first lady was excellent, bubba was excellent. ms. grandholme, i don't know what happened to her, but she was exciting. but the president of the united states was stable, he was flat, he was repetitive. it's the same thing we've been hearing over and over again, and i think it was a real let- down at the end of the convention, and i think that has given quite frankly the republicans another chance, really, to turn this thing around and win this thing. so i think he could have closed the sale, the president could have, if it had been a tremendous speech and a program in there and something to look forward to but it was the same old speech. >> you think he was melancholy? >> you know, john, i don't know what it was, but he started off, and i just said this is boring. this is not the barack obama that you know -- he wasn't the barack obama
's the first of three days when the democrats make their case for a second term for president obama and vice president biden. >> woodruff: we'll take you to the floor to hear speakers and delegates. >> ifill: and step outside the arena to talk with massachusetts senate candidate elizabeth warren. >> woodruff: winning the youth vote was critical four years ago. ray suarez examines the effort this time around. >> ifill: half the delegates here are women. we'll look at the democrats' efforts to maintain their gender edge. >> woodruff: and gwen and i will be joined again tonight for insight and analysis from newshour regulars mark shields and david brooks. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> they can be enlightening or engaging. conversations help us learn and grow. at wells fargo, we believe you can never underestimate the power of a conversation. it's this exchange of ideas that helps you move ahead with confidence. because an open dialogue is what open
party endorsed presidential candidate barack obama, republican party endorsed presidential candidate mitt romney. debate subject area, domestic policy. debate moderator, jim lara. structure, six 15-minute segment. three focus on the economy, four, five, and six health care, the role of government and governing. procedure, each candidate gets two minutes to respond to a question posed by jim lara. time remaining is given to freewheeling discussion of segments. risk factor, dangerous, sometimes lethal. ♪ [music] ♪ >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago? is america as respected throughout the world as it was? do you feel that our security is as safe, that we're as strong as we were four years ago? if you answer all of those questions yes, why then i think your choice is obvious as to who you'll vote for. if you don't agree, if you don't think that this course that we've been on for the last four years is what
and ask deputy campaign manager stephanie cutter about the obama team's goals. >> ifill: then we examine the challenges ahead for the democrats floor reporter ray suarez talks to pollster andy kohut. >> woodruff: with the festivities here in a southern city, we assess what the party needs to do to win the south in november. >> ifill: and why conventions can be an important organizing tool. hari sreenivasan reports on the effort to win battleground north carolina's 15 electoral votes. >> woodruff: plus gwen and i will be joined here tonight and every night this week for insight and analysis from newshour regulars mark shields and david brooks. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corp
. and president obama and vice president biden moved to answer the challenge and make ready for their own party gathering. on the morning after, the romney-ryan team came together in lakeland, florida, to thank the state for hosting the republican's big party. >> what a great convention, huh? >> brown: the vice presidential nominee stayed on the attack, drawing on a line from his convention speech. >> college grads should not spend their 20s in their childhood bedrooms, looking up at fading obama posters wondering when they can move out and get on with their lives! >> brown: the man at the top of the ticket also renewed a theme from his speech-- winning over former supporters of the president. >> i need to have you do the work on november 6 that gets me elected in florida. for that to happen, you are going to have to go out and find a person or two who voted for barack obama. i know they're here-- you can see some of the glue on the back of their bumper sticker. find them and convince them to get on the team. >> brown: romney then made a change to his schedule and diverted to louisiana to surve
news for president obama's re-election bid, and a talking point for mitt romney's campaign. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we debate the candidates' policy prescriptions, and the impact of the new numbers on any bounce for democrats after their convention. >> woodruff: ray suarez examines the pakistan-based insurgents known as the haqqani network, designated a terrorist group by the state department. >> brown: what will it take to convince voters still on the fence? margaret warner talked to a group of undecided virginians who watched the president's speech last night. >> i would have liked a lot more optimism, a lot more energy about moving forward. >> it didn't change my mind. it didn't change my opinion. it didn't offer anything that i didn't really know before. >> woodruff: back from two weeks of political conventions are mark shields and david brooks. >> brown: and who's calling the penalties and signaling the touchdowns? the football season begins with replacement referees. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight'
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: president obama and mitt romney are refining their attacks on each other over foreign policy, the economy, and taxes, as they count down to their first debate. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk with npr's ari shapiro about the blitz of campaign ads in colorado springs, a republican- leaning city in a critical swing state. >> ifill: plus stuart rothenberg and susan page take us inside the strategy behind the message. >> woodruff: then, from syria, bill neely reports on the stalemate in the city of homs, as government troops target rebel bastions. >> one-and-a-half years after it began and the battle for this city and for syria grinds on relentlessly. the bombardment of hommes. the war here is as intense as ever. >> ifill: as world leaders gather in new york for the annual meeting of the united nations general assembly. margaret warner gives us a preview. >> woodruff: will new genetic findings reshape the treatment of breast cancer? we ask dr. harold var
, in atlanta, he insisted average americans would do far better under him, than under president obama. >> the question in this campaign is not who cares about the poor and middle class. i do; he does. the question is, who can help the poor and middle class. i can; he can't. he's proven it in four years. >> holman: romney also cited a 1998 speech in which mr. obama said he believes in redistribution of wealth to make sure everybody's got a shot. but white house spokesman jay carney dismissed the criticism. >> all of us who follow politics and policy, whether we're on this side or your side of the podium, have seen circumstances like this where a campaign is having a very bad day or a very bad week. and in circumstances like that, there are efforts made-- sometimes desperate efforts made to change the subject. >> holman: also today, topics for the first of three presidential debates were announced. the moderator-- the "newshour's" own jim lehrer-- said there will be three, 15-minute segments on the economy, and three more on health care, the role of government and governing. the debate
for president obama tomorrow night where he would give his acceptance speech. because of threatening skies, that has been canceled and moved indoors to the arena where the rest of the convention has been held. well, it means some inconvenience for the people who were set to appear there. it means some inconvenience for the people who were staging the event, but the real problem is with the tens of thousands of people who gave tens of thousands of volunteer hours in order to qualify for a ticket to see the president accept the nomination of his party for another term as president. there's no place to put an extra 60,000 people in this arena. and then, there's mundane considerations. how do you move the stage set inside? and where do you get a couple of hundred thousand balloons. there may be no balloon drop here. there just aren't enough balloons to be had. >> ifill: who do we expect to hear from tonight on the schedule? >> suarez: tonight as mentioned will be a lot of economics but also with a heavy doll up of politics, along with the leader of the a.f.l.-c.i.o., richard trumpica, and the
would keep the bush tax cuts in place. fewer than half knew that romney and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholarly community. and to our surprise, we consistently find that those who watch debates, regardless of the level of knowledge they come in with, come out with more accurate knowledge as a general group. and they do this because those who haven't paid a great deal of attention have a lot to learn. those of us who'v
and mrs. obama gathered on the south lawn of the white house. a bell tolled three times at 8:46 a.m., the moment the first hijacked plane struck the north tower in new york. then, a moment of silence. from there, the president took the short ride across the potomac to place a wreath for the 184 killed at the pentagon. several hundred people listened as mr. obama remembered the day's multiple shocks. >> even now all these years later, it is easy for those of us who lived through that day to close our eyes and to find ourselves back there. back here. back when grief crashed over us like an awful wave, when americans everywhere held each other tight. this is never an easy day, but it is especially difficult for all of you. the families of nearly 3,000 innocents who lost their lives. >> ifill: vice president biden echoed that sentiment in shanksville, pennsylvania. flight 93 crashed after its passengers fought back against the hijackers. >> my personal prayer for all of you is that in every succeeding year, you're able to sing more than you weep. may god truly bless you and bless the
, president obama condemned violence in the muslim world, and he told world leaders time is running out to resolve differences over iran's nuclear program. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get reaction to the president's speech from margaret warner in new york. >> woodruff: and we assess the administration's foreign policy as mitt romney criticizes the president for the way he's handled overseas crises. >> ifill: then, paul solman looks at why applying for jobs online may just not work. >> woodruff: what's behind the >> i check the email and the job sites hourly. from 7:00 in the morning until midnight. >> woodruff: what's behind the drop in s.a.t. scores? ray suarez looks at the surge in the number of students taking the test, and what it tells us about learning. >> ifill: plus, we talk with journalist bob merry. his new book explores how voters, pollsters, and historians judge presidents. >> you can't be a leader of destiny, as i describe it, and change the critical landscape simply because you got elected president and willed
studies at johns hopkins university. he served in the obama administration's state department focusing on afghanistan and pakistan. gentlemen, thank you both for being with us. vali nasr, let me start with you. general dempsey, we heard him say this is a very serious threat to the war effort. we know that secretary panetta, in addition to what we just heard him say, also called this the last gasp of a dying insurgency. who is right? >> well, the taliban have been under pressure for some time, but they are proving to be very entrepreneurial and effective in carrying out new ways of attack. they're trying to send a message to the afghan people that they still have fight in them, that they have momentum on their side. i think the fact that these attacks continue and we see more and more americans and foreign troops die and there is audacious attacks on bases, the result does worry the afghan population that the taliban has still got a lot of energy at the same time we're telling the afghan population that we are ready to leave. >> woodruff: hodo you see this? which is it? >> i think it ca
,000. >> woodruff: president obama and governor mitt romney were slugging it out again today on the campaign trail, both of them in the battleground state of ohio. and both of them mindful of the need to turn out younger voters, who went overwhelmingly for mr. obama in 2008, but who are proving more elusive this year. i traveled to the columbus area this past weekend ahead of the candidates to find out just how elusive. >> fired up! ready to go! >> woodruff: ohio state university students about to head out from an obama campaign office to register voters, yell a familiar refrain. >> fired up! ready to go! >> woodruff: they are a coveted voting block for the president, in this fiercely contested swing state. four years ago, mr. obama won 18- to 29-year-olds nationwide by 66% to 32%. a margin so large, young people were credited with putting him over the top in several key states. >> are you registered to vote? >> woodruff: surveys suggest he's sure to capture the majority of the youngest voter block again. but after four years of watching the president grapple with the realities of governing, they'
phone call from president obama wednesday night. according to those accounts, chastened egyptian officials then scrambled to defuse the volatile situation. today, reuters reported that u.s. intelligence officials had concerns after clips of the offending movie, "the innocence of muslims," were first broadcast saturday in egypt. but white house officials said there was no advance warning of what was coming. meanwhile, in libya, the president of the national assembly visited the charred ruins of the u.s. consulate in benghazi, where ambassador chris stevens and three colleagues died tuesday. >> ( translated ): i want to offer my thanks to ambassador stevens. i want to thank him and to thank the american people who gave birth to such special diplomats. >> brown: the bodies of the four slain americans were repatriated today outside washington at joint base andrews. >> let light perpetual shine on chris, sean, glen and tyrone. >> brown: ambassador stevens and state department officer sean smith were brought home with two former navy seals who'd been detailed to protect stevens, tyrone
jones released video that shows romney dismissing supporters of president obama. >> 47%. people will vote for the president no matter what. 47% are with him. they depend on government. they believe that they are victims who believe that government has a responsibility to care for them. >> woodruff: the republican nominee goes on to say that obama voters don't care about his plans for tax cuts. >> these are people who pay no income tax. 47% of americans pay no income tax. our message of low taxes doesn't connect. he'll be out there talking about tax cuts for the rich. that's what they sell every four years. so my job is not to worry about those people. i'll never convince them. that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives. >> woodruff: romney's reference to the 47% who pay no federal income taxes draws roughly on data from the nonpartisan tax policy center. the group's analysis further shows more than a quarter of americans pay payroll taxes without incurring income tax liability. other groups paying no federal income tax include elderly people on social
to restore confidence in the u.s. economy. stocks are at their highest point since president obama took office. still, many americans are asking themselves if they're better off now than they were four years ago. investors are looking at their financial statements as a guide. but as erika miller explains, that doesn't necessarily mean americans are feeling better about their economic situation. >> reporter: four years ago, the financial crisis was getting worse and the global economy falling off a cliff. so it's no wonder many americans are feeling better about their financial situation now versus four years ago. >> i'm better off right now than i was four years ago by a long shot. >> i feel more comfortable, because i'm older, i have more of a vision of what i want for my future. >> reporter: but others say they're worse off, especially those living paycheck to paycheck or out of work. >> three years ago, i had a job. i've been disemployed for a year now. >> reporter: and plenty of other americans aren't exactly sure where they stand. >> i don't know if i have a lot to base it on; i'm
. and president obama had a pointed answer on egypt in an interview last night with spanish-language telemundo. >> i don't think that we'd consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. they are a new government that's trying to find its way. they were democratically elected, and we need to see how they respond to this incident. in some cases, they've said the right things; in some, they've taken steps not aligned with our interests. >> woodruff: morsi spoke with mr. obama last night and asked for action against the maker of the inflammatory video, titled "the innocence of muslims." >> ( translated ): i called him in order to ask him to put an end to such behavior. and of course, we assured president obama that we will be keen and we will not permit any such event, any such occurrence in our country against the embassy territories in the future. >> woodruff: today, in washington, secretary of state clinton called the video "disgusting and reprehensible." >> it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose, to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. but as i said yesterday, ther
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama today condemned the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya that killed four americans, including the ambassador. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight: we get the latest on the deadly assault, believed to have been planned in advance and sparked by an anti-muslim internet video. >> woodruff: plus, we examine the move by governor romney to criticize the president's handling of the libya tinderbox. was it justified or not? we hear from both sides. >> ifill: then, jeffrey brown looks at how the latest iphone upgrade is accelerating competition in the smartphone industry. >> woodruff: are chemicals sprayed in oregon's forests dangerous or not? we have a report from our partners at the center for investigative reporting. >> they're spraying with helicopters all these ridged tops, so everything they're spraying up top eventually gets down to all of these residents. >> forced application of herbicides is done in accordance with all state laws. and we believe i
in the presidential race had surpassed $600 million: $318.5 million for team romney, $287.2 million for team obama. and get this: more than half of all that money for ads has been sent in just three swing states, florida, ohio and virginia. what's more, huge sums, not only for ads but for get-out-the-vote efforts like mailings and robocalls are going into house and senate races in the fight to control congress. altogether, three billion dollars in campaign cash have been raised so far, and a projected $6 billion by the election, less than seven weeks away. it's not just that we're being hit by swarms of ads thicker than locusts. what's truly frightening is that we don't know who's really paying for them. president barack obama: i'm pledging to cut the deficit -- >>> romney's worth $200 million. >>> the president's doing a mediocre job. >>> governor romney cares about big business. >>> real job growth cut the debt. >>> i had no healthcare. >>> -- to the highest corporate bidders -- >>> if you're a super pac, empowered by the supreme court's citizens united decision to take unlimited donations, you'
-- >> castigating the agreement president obama and the republicans had made to extend the bush tax cuts for the ultra-rich, lower their estate taxes, and jeopardize the future of the social security trust fund by diverting revenue away from it to other purposes. >> we have got to stand tall and draw a line in the sand and simply say, "enough is enough." >> around 7:00 that evening, bernie sanders finished, and what happened next was phenomenal. the senate server, overwhelmed, went down -- crashed. the switchboards were jammed. and like sparks from 100,000 watch fires lighting up the distant hills and hollows, his words flew across the country. that speech is now this book entitled, "the speech." i spoke with senator sanders earlier in the week. good to have you. >> great to be with you, bill. >> i watched the democratic convention, as perhaps you did. and i heard all the speeches about opportunity and solidarity. and i saw that vast array of faces, of every color, every age, every gender. and i thought, "there are still two democratic parties in this country, the party out across the co
. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were nearly 400,000 more jobs created in the previous year that ended in march. that would mean that there are a higher number of jobs than when president obama took office. but the u.s. still has four million fewe
. there's no love for romney among these people, but they are united in their loathing of barack obama. and that's where ralph reed comes in. >> four years ago, we heard a lot of talk about hope and change. people were fainting at campaign rallies. there were che guevera posters hanging in dorm rooms. there was one candidate who stood in front of greek columns and vowed to heal the planet and cause the oceans to recede. but you see our hope is in something this world doesn't fully understand. we hope for a kingdom yet to come. the hope of a new heaven and a new earth, in which dwelleth righteousness. a place where every tear will be wiped away. and every broken heart will be healed. and all the pain and brokenness and poverty and injustice of this world will be gone. >> but first there's the devil to chase. >> i believe that barack obama is a direct threat to the survival of the country i grew up in. >> dear friends, our religious liberty is at stake in this election, because obama is at war with all religion in any public place, any public square any public school. >> for the first ti
a post-convention corner, as president obama's campaign says it beat mitt romney in fundraising last month. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, as polls show a gap opening up between the candidates, is the republican ticket shifting its message more toward the middle? we break down the latest from the campaign trail with stu rothenberg and susan page. >> brown: then, no school in chicago. we update the heated labor dispute between the city and its teachers over pay for performance and other issues. >> woodruff: margaret warner examines the death sentence handed down to iraq's sunni vice president, tariq al-hashimi, as fears there rise of spreading sectarian violence. >> brown: special correspondent john tulenko reports on a community college program that has turned wine into jobs in washington state. >> i wanted to teach them how to make good wine. we got the medals. wow, we did it. it's happening. >> woodruff: making a tough call in the heat of a pennant race. we'll talk about why the washington nationals have benched ace pit
obama also spoke out against iran. >> a nuclear-armed iran is not a challenge that can be contained. it would threaten the elimination of israel, the security of gulf nations, and the stability of the global economy. that is why he united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> woodruff: but iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, has long insisted that the country's nuclear program is only for peaceful purposes. and during his own speech yesterday, he denounced potential military action by israel. >> testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threats by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> woodruff: earlier this week, iran unveiled a new long-range reconnaissance drone and the country's revolutionary guard said it tested new missiles as well. prime minister netanyahu noted t
, and sri lanka, but no less anti-american with crowds burning flags and effigies of president obama. in washington, u.s. officials kept a close eye on events, as secretary of state hillary clinton met with the pakistani foreign minister. >> i want to thank the government of pakistan for their efforts to protect our embassy in islamabad, and consulates in lahore, peshawar and karachi. and i want to be clear, as i have said on numerous occasions- - the violence we've seen cannot be tolerated. of course, there is provocation, and we have certainly made clear that we do not in any way support provocation. >> brown: that provocation took the form of an online trailer for a film made by a california man mocking the prophet mohammed. new fuel was added this week when a french satirical magazine published crude cartoons of mohammed. hoping to ease the tensions, the u.s. embassy in islamabad began airing an ad on pakistani television yesterday with clips of secretary clinton and president obama. >> we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others. >> brown: pakistan's relat
convention. and president obama is hoping a lot of voters say "yes". for small businesses the answer is both "yes" and "no". job cuts led some entrepreneurs to open their own businesses. but, some firms say the last four years have been harder for them. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: matt kollar spends much of his days stocking shelves at his hardware store in chicago's lincoln square neighborhood. kollar got the idea to open the store four years ago. and even though he had a solid business record as a theater set builder, it took kollar two years to get a loan. >> i went to 12 different banks. i went to all the local banks. i had three banks fail on me after approving the loan. >> reporter: across the u.s. many small businesses say the past few years have been among their toughest. >> we've done well, but our profits have shrunk and gotten eaten up by a lot of other things: insurance, taxes, and other things, rent, etc. >> reporter: the national federation of independent business says in 2009 its small business optimism index declined to its lowest level in 30 years. while the inde
between the white house and china over trade. the obama administration complains about new trade abuses on auto exports, china fires back on unfair trade practices by the u.s. from stocks to oil and gold prices, we get the outlook for what to expect between now and the end of the year. and a birthday for "occupy wall street". while protests and arrests mark the movement's first anniversary, a look at what it's accomplished. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! trade tensions between the united states and china are heating up again. this morning, the two countries challenged each other in the world trade organization. the u.s. is accusing china of illegally subsidizing auto and auto parts exports, and hurting u.s. made goods. and china claims trade laws here, open the door for illegal tariffs on a wide range of chinese products. sylvia hall breaks down what's behind the latest flareup. >> reporter: here in the u.s., the auto and auto parts industries employ about 800,000 american workers. the government says those workers are hurt by the money china gives to subsidize its own auto industry
. >> tom: about 70% of hispanic voters favor president obama in the upcoming election according to the latest gallup poll. but experts say getting them to cast votes could be tricky. many hispanic businesses say they're disappointed by obama's handling of the economy, healthcare and immigration. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: alfonso silva's biscuits and cookies have been making mouths water in chicago's pilsen neighborhood for three decades. but in recent years he's seen a drop off in customers. >> sometimes it's okay, but sometimes it's very bad because of the economy. >> reporter: boarded up storefronts throughout pilsen reflect the toll the sour economy has taken on hispanic businesses in chicago and across the nation. unemployment is part of the problem. in august the jobless rate among hispanics was 10.2%. almost 2% points higher than the overall rate. >> because of the level of unemployment people are not spending as they were in previous years and that certainly is going to hurt a business that deals directly with consumers. >> reporter: deportation is another p
is opinions aside, and no entity. obama is ahead. all the polls in the key states, the battleground states, obama has a lead as well. the markets discounted an obama win, and as a result, this bullish for risk, and for oil as well. >> how high do you continuing crude could go? >> i think $96, $97. not because of an obama victory, but because of bifurcation economically around the world. oi. the split side, what happen fist we can have a romney victory. >> i think oil rallies in either case. if romney wins, it rallies more, because romney victory is risk conducive which would send oil higher. >> ho how big is the uncertaint? >> much less than a few months ago. the morkt has begun to sdounlt an obama victory. not because of political uncertainty, but more because of economic certains. >> once we get beyond the election, what will be the driver for crude? >> economic growth, hands down. fi. we look at the crude contracts >> one of the benefits of trading crew, is you can trade it on the front months and also the supply and demand five, six, sen, eight years down the road. if you look at crude
the strike is testing reforms endorsed by the obama administration. >> reporter: chicago public school teachers pounded the pavement all day before the city's board of education headquarters. most wouldn't talk about their contract dispute with the city, but one supportive spouse did. >> they deserve whatever they need to teach our children. it's just pretty sad that it has to get to this extent. >> reporter: while wages and benefits are an issue with the nearly 30,000 educators-- an even bigger one concerns how mayor rahm emmanuel wants to evaluate them. the mayor is backing an obama administration policy that evaluates instructors based on student test scores. the teachers argue the broader community and families also influence learning. labor expert robert bruno says the teachers see current plan as an attack on public education. >> so from their perspective they're not just bargaining some narrow bread and butter issues, but they're looking at the collective bargaining process as a way to truly transform in a dramatic way what public education can and should be. >> reporter: mayor
with the elephant in the room being the affordable care act, the so-called obama care. this data comes in as this act continues to take effect as well as take shape. among the goals is to bend the cost curve, but at least initially seems like that cost curve is getting steeper. >> i think one of the things to keep in mind is that the affordable care act, most of the provisions come into play in 2014. >> tom: so lots of years to go there. we do have to note that you're talking to us despite the fact you're feeling under the weather yourself so, we'll let you go see the doctor tonight. david newman works the health care cost institute. >> tom: all this week, we've been looking at the view of the presidential election, from the trading pits. tonight "politics and the pits" takes us to gold. here's erika miller with trader anthony neglia. >> what happened to the price of gold if obama is reelected. >> if obama remains in office i believe a throft same policys will be put in place, interest rates will remain low until 2016, and i meef that the quantitative easing is going to have to play a
clips of president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton condemning the film. still, hundreds of demonstrators tried to reach the embassy in islamabad, by pushing aside huge shipping containers that cordoned off the area. riot police fired tear gas to disperse the crowd. a report on a bungled operation against gun-trafficking in arizona drew praise today from house republicans. they've been investigating "operation fast and furious" for months. at a hearing, the justice department's inspector general michael horowitz listed a string of mistakes by federal law enforcement officials trying to track illegal guns. hundreds of the weapons ended up with mexican drug gangs. >> what we heard from the agents was they had made a conscious decision that the long-term effort, that having a long-term investigative strategy that dismantled a large organization was the greater good that they were undertaking, to dismantle the organization, stop the trafficking, and that that was what they believed was in the best interest of the public safety as we found, that was an incorrect calculation. >
billion in higher revenue if president obama is reelected. but if romney takes the white house, he'll like raise taxes somewhere in the range of $250 billion. the rest would come from spending cuts. more from cuts in health care and entitlements under romney. more from defense under president obama. add it all up, and the size is somewhere around two or three trillion dollars. the goal of the package is clear. >> all three of the major ratings agencies have said that if congress doesn't pass significant deficit reduction-- enough to make debt to g.d.p.-- put is on a sustainable path within a reasonable period of time, that they'll all downgrade. and i think that's going to become the bogey. >> darren: a $2 trillion or $3 trillion deficit reduction package would be a sizeable step towards stabilizing our debt. but not everyone thinks such an outcome is likely. >> i don't see how the politics of this has changed very much. i don't see more people suddenly willing to change on anything. the election is polarization, hyper partisan, and not really providing the kind of forum you need for an ho
underway in charlotte, north carolina. first lady, michelle obama takes center stage with the prime time speech expected to focus on the personal side of president obama, but likely will be an economic message as well. the president has been focusoth middle class in recent campaign appearances looking forward to the convention speech on thursday night, and stay focused. >> the former chairman of the white house council of economic advisers joins us from the convention. austan welcome back to nbr. are americans better off now than four years ago? now do you answer that? >> on average yes. >> in 200 noox*ib, it was january but one of the first economic months in this country. we lost 800,000 jobs, and the stock market collapsed a net worth of something like 40%. so i think we're a long, long way that from, and anybody who thinks that they would like to trade places with last month versus january, 2009, but likely asleep then. >> we asked are they as good today as they thought they would be four years ago'd: perhaps there's a more difficult question for the administration, isn't it? >> if y
have to build that into our model and say that's not going to change. so if obama gets elected they stay in. if romeny gets elected which he won't then he can't necessarily change it so let's just build that those tax cuts are gonna expire at the end of the year period. the one thing that i can tell you that is very troublesome to me as i look at prices, as i look across as i look at hog prices priced for next summer, i look at cattle prices, i look at grain prices and that is that why is it that we ignore the food and energy component of cpi? so, i could be ben bernanke's speech writer because he says the same thing every time he goes in front of the senate is we don't see any particular problem with inflation. really, we don't corn prices just nearly double in three months. so, how is it there is no inflation? >> reporter: do you get any sense that the ethanol mandate is going to change under either administration under obama or if romney would get elected? >> well is sure seems like the word ethanol has turned into a pejorative and it's not exactly the most positive topic. i
in the age of obama." the prolific jamie raskin also joins us. one of the country's leading scholars on constitutional law, he teaches at american university and is a maryland state senator, where in his first legislative session alone he managed to see more than a dozen of his bills pass into law. he's been described as "one of the nation's most talented state legislators." his many writings include a centerpiece article in this special issue of "the nation." welcome to you both. >> thanks so much. >> okay, let's play the numbers. what comes to mind when i call out 79, 76, 75, and 73? >> the age of the four oldest justices on the court. and one of the reasons we did this issue is that as we enter this election season, this election could determine not only the future of the court for generations to come but the shape of our democracy for generations to come. >> you've devoted whole editions of the magazine, in the past, to the supreme court. what makes this one different? >> i think we're at a moment, bill, where we are witnessing the unprecedented concentration of power, wealth, an
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